American Modernisms: New Mexico and American Modernisms 1914-1940 TRAVEL/ CANCELLED

Course Code
ARTH 3595
Credits
3
Department
Elizabeth Turner
Professir
Adriana Green

Course will take place in New Mexico. This course examines how New Mexico became the site of a complex and significant chapter in the history of American Modernism, and equips students with experiential knowledge and new skills in visual analysis and critical reading. Since the 1890s artists from the East, searching for American cultural identities distinct from Europe, established art colonies in Santa Fe and Taos, locations shaped by centuries-long interactions between Indigenous communities and Spanish and American settler colonialism. The dynamics of local resistance and national incorporation attracted key New York modernists seeking to escape from industrialization and to derive authentic connection between craft, art and life; Arthur Dow, Robert Henri, John Sloan, Stuart Davis, Marsden Hartley, and Georgia O’Keeffe, who famously established herself at Abiquiu, made subjects of both the natural landscape and Pueblo peoples.

Course fee is $3000 and covers lodging, museum entrance fees, and some meals.  Students arrange their own transportation to and from New Mexico.